Connect with us

Navy

Future Frigate capability described by Chief of Navy

SEA 5000 Phase 1 Announcement

D+I Newsroom

Published

on

future-frigate
Photo: Department of Defence

Chief of Navy, Vice Admiral Tim Barrett, AO, CSC, RAN, describes the capability of the Future Frigate to members of Air Warfare Destroyer, NUSHIP Brisbane’s, ship’s company at Osborne in South Australia.

On 29 June 2018, BAE Systems Australia were announced as the successful bid to design the Global Combat Ship – Australia Hunter Class frigates, to be built by ASC Shipbuilding at the Osborne Naval Shipyard in Adelaide, South Australia.

SEA 5000 Phase 1 Future Frigate Program will deliver anti-submarine warfare frigates,the Hunter class.

The Hunter class enter service in the late 2020s replacing the eight Anzac frigates, which have been in service since 1996.

The Hunter class will have the capability to conduct a variety of missions independently, or as part of a task group, with sufficient range and endurance to operate effectively throughout the region.

The frigates will also have the flexibility to support non-warfare roles such as humanitarian assistance and disaster relief.

Incorporating the leading-edge Australian-developed CEA Phased-Array Radar and the US Navy’s Aegis combat management system, with an Australian interface developed by Saab Australia, the Hunter class will be one of the most capable warships in the world.

Defence.com.au and D + I Magazine has a dedicated news desk within the 24/7 Cyber Newsroom. We're now able to publish news as it comes to hand, anytime day or night.

Military Operations

HMAS Warramunga deploys for nine month Middle East mission

HMAS Warramunga and her ship’s 190 company has departed Fleet Base East at Garden Island, Sydney for maritime security operations in the Middle East.

D+I Newsroom

Published

on

hmas-warramunga-departure

The Minister for Defence, Senator the Hon Marise Payne, Chief of Navy, Vice Admiral Tim Barrett joined family and friends to farewell HMAS Warramunga and loved ones for their nine-month deployment to Operation Manitou.

During the deployment, Warramunga may undertake counter-terrorism and counter-piracy missions and conduct regional engagement to enhance maritime security cooperation.

The deployment is part of the Australian Defence Force contribution to the multi-national Combined Maritime Forces, promoting security, stability and prosperity in the Middle East, and today Warramunga’s departure will mark the 66th rotation of a Royal Australian Navy ship to the region since 1990.

Minister Payne said Warramunga would work as part of an international coalition, the Combined Maritime Forces, to interrupt the illegal drug trade that funds terrorism.

“Australia has a long-standing commitment to the Combined Maritime Forces in the Middle East region, and Warramunga is but the latest Royal Australian Navy vessel committed to this fight against terrorist operations,” Minister Payne said.

“For decades, the men and women of the Royal Australian Navy have regularly seized drugs and other illegal cargoes from the high seas.

“Warramunga will further advance Australia’s high standing with our Allies, together making a significant global difference and protect Australia’s national interests abroad.”

Warramunga’s Commanding Officer, Commander Dugald Clelland, said the ship’s company were highly trained and motivated to carry out the tasks ahead.

“The men and women who serve in Warramunga have worked very hard preparing the ship for this long deployment,” Commander Clelland said.

“This will be the ship’s third deployment to the Middle East and we carry forward a considerable legacy.

“For 27 years, Australian warships have made significant contributions to peace and security in the region and we’re deeply committed to continuing this legacy and honouring the service of those who have come before us.

“We sail with the knowledge our friends and families will support us the entire way as we work to make the world safer and more stable.”

Warramunga replaces HMAS Newcastle as Australia’s ship in the Middle East region. Newcastle is due to return to Australia in the coming weeks.

HMAS-Warramunga

© 2017 Commonwealth of Australia | Photo: ABAWASM Kieran Dempsey | Friends and family gather at Fleet Base East, Garden Island, Sydney, to farewell HMAS Warramunga as she departs for Operation Manitou.

Continue Reading

Defence Industry

Chief of Navy closes Sea Power Conference

Chief of Navy, Vice Admiral Tim Barrett, AO, CSC, RAN, spoke at the closing ceremony of the 2017 SeaPower conference

D+I Newsroom

Published

on

chief-of-navy

Last week the Royal Australian Navy hosted the biennial Sea Power Conference, with senior naval delegations from around the world descending on Sydney for three days of discussions and Navy-to-Navy engagements.

Run alongside the Pacific 2017 international maritime exposition, Sea Power Conference is Navy’s premier gathering of naval chiefs and this year will explore the broad theme of ‘The Navy and the Nation’, focusing on maritime identity, the significance of maritime economics and use of oceans.

Chief of Navy, Vice Admiral Tim Barrett, AO, CSC, RAN, spoke at the closing ceremony of the 2017 SeaPower conference while onboard the recently commissioned Air Warfare Destroyer HMAS Hobart.

Continue Reading

Navy

Minister for Defence visits Submarine Training and Systems Centre

Minister for Defence, Senator the Hon Marise Payne, is escorted on a tour of the Submarine Training and Systems Centre, by Director Training Authority – Submarines, Commander Dylan Findlater, RAN, (left) and Commander Submarine Force, Captain Geoff Wadley, CSC, RAN, during a visit to HMAS Stirling, Western Australia.

D+I Newsroom

Published

on

Defence-Minister-Submarine-Training-Centre

Minister for Defence, Senator the Hon Marise Payne, was today escorted on a tour of the Submarine Training and Systems Centre, by Director Training Authority – Submarines, Commander Dylan Findlater, RAN, (left) and Commander Submarine Force, Captain Geoff Wadley, CSC, RAN, during a visit to HMAS Stirling, Western Australia.

Located at HMAS Sterling, the Submarine Training and Systems Centre facilitates immersive training and includes a virtual submarine walkthrough simulation.

It is a highly effective training tool that allows exploration of the submarine in ways that were previously unavailable due to limited access to physical submarines. It is used in initial training and Collins Class Submarine familiarisation, safety routines and the location and recognition of fitted equipment and can be used to support operator, maintenance and procedural training.

During the visit, the minister also toured the Collins Class Submarine HMAS Farncomb.

Defence industry company ASC has been an integral part of submariner training at the Submarine Training and Systems Centre at HMAS Stirling in Western Australia since 1992.

The centre is housed within the largest Royal Australian Navy establishment in the country, Perth based HMAS Sterling.

Did you know…?

The name of Perth base HMAS Stirling was selected to honour the name of Captain James Stirling, Royal Navy, the naval officer who landed on Garden Island in 1827 and returned in June, 1829 to found not only the first European settlement in Western Australia, but also the first free colony anywhere in Australia. Stirling’s makeshift camp was set-up on the craggy rock outcrop on the eastern side of the island, which today is known as Cliff Head and is the site of a memorial. Stirling‘s crest is based on the Stirling family coat-of-arms.

Since its commissioning on 28 July 1978 Stirling has expanded enormously within its existing boundaries and has seen building such as the Submarine Escape Training Facility – one of only six in the world and the only one in the southern hemisphere constructed.

Today it is the largest base in the RAN and home to more than 2,300 service personnel, 600 Defence civilians and 500 long-term contractors.

Some 12 Fleet units including RAN’s Anzac Class frigates and Collins Class submarines are stationed here, along with some 70 units including the Submarine Training and Systems Centre (STSC), AUSCDT Four and the Defence Communications Station (DEFCOMMSTA) Perth.

The 314 metre long two-level: “Diamantina Pier” and the redeveloped small ships harbour have vastly increased the wharf and berthing space available to surface ships and submarines at Stirling.

Other major additions have been the helicopter support facility located on the southern end of Garden Island, extensions to the RAN Submarine Training and Systems Centre, the Training Centre-West complex and a trials, research and support facility.

HMAS Stirling‘s primary purpose is to provide operational and logistics support to the RAN ships, submarines and aircraft based in WA.

Continue Reading
Advertisement

New Facebook Page

Trending

Live Chat
1
Close chat
Get Defence + Industry Magazine by simply typing 'subscribe' and we'll send you a free download link for each new issue!

Subscribe Free