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DCNS changes its name to Naval Group

Europe’s largest naval shipbuilder, DCNS, has today officially changed its name to Naval Group.

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Naval Group, it’s the new name for Europe’s largest naval shipbuilder. 

DCSN has officially changed its name to Naval Group, said to be a natural step in the company’s history, aimed at aligning with our ambitions to guarantee exposure and credibility in international markets.

“The creation of a strong, unifying brand that embodies both our heritage and our expertise will enable us to meet two major objectives,” Naval Group CEO, Herve Guillou said.

“These are to continue to attract and retain the best and brightest talent for our workforce and to increase our international reach and win new markets”, Mr Guillou said.

“We are extremely proud of our history and what we have achieved but we also believe it is important to look forward and think about what opportunities are ahead,” he said.

“Last year we secured our company’s largest international contract for the design and build of Australia’s next generation of 12 submarines.

“This contract combined with the creation of our marine renewable energy subsidiary recently represents the beginning of the next significant phase of our company.

“We are a truly global company and we feel it is only appropriate to start this new phase with our new, stronger identity.

“Our name change of course, will have no impact on our commitment to deliver Australia’s next generation of submarines.

“We are honored to be undertaking this important project for the Australian Government and the Australian people.

“The Future Submarine Program is an exciting project that will grow the overall workforce and provide opportunities for generations of Australians,” Mr Guillou said.

Questions & Answers

Why is the DCNS changing the name?

Following a comprehensive review of our brand and our service offerings we decided it was time to update the brand to better reflect who we are now and where we want to be in the future.

DCNS is not a real acronym. It stems from when we were a wholly owned French Government body called “direction des constructions navales”. We have grown so much since that time.

Today, we are a truly global company with a powerful global presence. Being chosen to design and build the next generation of submarines for the Australian Government is a good example and marks a real turning point for our company and our long-term industrial presence outside of France.

The launch of our energies subsidiary is another good example and marks the culmination of more than a decade of investment in marine renewable energy (MRE) and signals the Group’s desire to move from an R&D phase into a phase of industrial development to become a global leader.

What does NAVAL Group mean?

NAVAL Group is a strong, unifying brand that embodies both our heritage and our expertise and immediately refers to our core areas of activity.

Will NAVAL Group still offer the same business areas as DCNS?

Yes. Naval Group will continue to design, produce and sustain submarines and surface ships. The Group will also continue to provide services for naval shipyards and bases and offer a wide range of marine renewable energy solutions.

What impact does this name change have on Australia?

Other than the change in name, there will be no impact to our commitment to design and build Australia’s next generation of submarines.

The Future Submarine Program is one of the most important projects for Australia and is equally important to the France-Australia relationship. It is our honour to be undertaking this project for our nation’s important strategic ally.

What happens next?

The official name change takes place on the 28th June. New branding material will be rolled out over the coming weeks.

About Naval Group

Naval Group is the European leader in naval defence and a major player in marine renewable energy. The Group’s success as an advanced technology company with global reach is built on meeting customer needs by deploying exceptional know-how, unique industrial resources and an ability to develop innovative strategic partnerships. Naval Group designs and builds submarines and surface combatants, develops associated systems and infrastructure, and offers a full range of services to naval bases and shipyards. The Group has also expanded its focus into marine renewable energy. Aware of its corporate social responsibilities, Naval Group is a member of the United Nations Global Compact. Naval Group generates annual revenues of €3.2 billion and employs around 12,800 people (2016 data).

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Navy

Future Frigate capability described by Chief of Navy

SEA 5000 Phase 1 Announcement

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Photo: Department of Defence

Chief of Navy, Vice Admiral Tim Barrett, AO, CSC, RAN, describes the capability of the Future Frigate to members of Air Warfare Destroyer, NUSHIP Brisbane’s, ship’s company at Osborne in South Australia.

On 29 June 2018, BAE Systems Australia were announced as the successful bid to design the Global Combat Ship – Australia Hunter Class frigates, to be built by ASC Shipbuilding at the Osborne Naval Shipyard in Adelaide, South Australia.

SEA 5000 Phase 1 Future Frigate Program will deliver anti-submarine warfare frigates,the Hunter class.

The Hunter class enter service in the late 2020s replacing the eight Anzac frigates, which have been in service since 1996.

The Hunter class will have the capability to conduct a variety of missions independently, or as part of a task group, with sufficient range and endurance to operate effectively throughout the region.

The frigates will also have the flexibility to support non-warfare roles such as humanitarian assistance and disaster relief.

Incorporating the leading-edge Australian-developed CEA Phased-Array Radar and the US Navy’s Aegis combat management system, with an Australian interface developed by Saab Australia, the Hunter class will be one of the most capable warships in the world.

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Defence Industry

Chief of Navy closes Sea Power Conference

Chief of Navy, Vice Admiral Tim Barrett, AO, CSC, RAN, spoke at the closing ceremony of the 2017 SeaPower conference

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Last week the Royal Australian Navy hosted the biennial Sea Power Conference, with senior naval delegations from around the world descending on Sydney for three days of discussions and Navy-to-Navy engagements.

Run alongside the Pacific 2017 international maritime exposition, Sea Power Conference is Navy’s premier gathering of naval chiefs and this year will explore the broad theme of ‘The Navy and the Nation’, focusing on maritime identity, the significance of maritime economics and use of oceans.

Chief of Navy, Vice Admiral Tim Barrett, AO, CSC, RAN, spoke at the closing ceremony of the 2017 SeaPower conference while onboard the recently commissioned Air Warfare Destroyer HMAS Hobart.

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Army

Army’s Hawkei demonstrates Operational Intelligence

The CASG Land 121 Phase 4 project team has put the Hawkei protected vehicle’s new C4I Integral Computing System (ICS) to the test.

Terry Turner

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The Capability Acquisition and Sustainment Group’s (CASG) Land 121 Phase 4 project team has put the Hawkei protected vehicle’s new C4I Integral Computing System (ICS) to the test, during a demonstration of the deployable Protected Mobility Vehicle – Light (PMV-L) capability at the Monegeetta Proving Ground.

During the activity a Project Charter for the ICS was signed, guiding the interaction and collaboration between Defence and the nine contractors involved in delivery of the ICS; Thales Australia, Cablex, Elbit Land Systems Australia, Esterline, Harris Australia, Kongsberg, Raytheon, Rockwell Collins, and Thomas Global Systems.

Land 121 Phase 4 Project Director COL John McLean said that the ICS reflects the Australian Army’s requirement for a more integrated approach to C4I on vehicles that realises benefits in the areas of useability, space, weight and power.

“Using generic vehicle architecture (GVA) and a central computing concept to host various C4I systems and communications, the ICS will optimise and centralise the flow of information to the user, enabling rapid decision making and multitasking at levels not previously achievable on land based platforms,” COL McLean said.

“The new ICS will enable the vehicle operator to manage radios, sensors, the Battle Management System, and weapon systems – all through a common interface.

“The ICS was demonstrated to work successfully with Army’s Battle Management System and communications suite, as well as other features and systems of the deployable PMV-L capability.”

While the demonstration was a contractual requirement for Hawkei’s Bendigo-based manufacturer Thales, it also gave the invited Defence stakeholders an opportunity to see the deployable PMV-L’s various planned features, including:

  • Integral Computing System (ICS) Command Vehicle installation
  • Battle Management System (BMS) operating on Windows 10
  • Advanced Field Artillery Tactical Data System (AFATDS)
  • Digital Terminal Control Station (DTCS)
  • Interactive Electronic Technical Manuals (IETMs)
  • Force Protection Electronic Counter Measures (FPECM)
  • Rocket Propelled Grenade Cage
  • Remote Weapon Station
  • Manned Weapon Mount

Visitors were also able to experience the handling characteristics and performance of the Hawkei through an interactive patrol demonstration.

The initial baseline of the C4I ICS will be available on low-rate-initial-production vehicles from 2018.

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